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Transportation reports: VMT and TIA

The Draft Environmental Impact Report issued by Santa Clara County on Stanford's General Use Permit application draws on two technical reports that evaluate the transportation effects of the proposed permit.

The reports were prepared by Fehr & Peers and revised in partnership with the county's independent transportation experts. The full reports are on the 2018 Application page Tabs 7a/b and 8.

View a summary of the Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Report  and Transportation Impact Analysis (TIA)

View Stanford's Transportation Strategy

View the Housing Alternatives SB 743 VMT Analysis

 

Vehicle Miles Traveled

A Vehicle Miles Traveled Analysis evaluates vehicle trips made throughout the day, with the objective of reducing the length and number of vehicle trips made by all project employees and residents.

Transportation Impact Analysis

The Transportation Impact Analysis is the study that typically is prepared to assess traffic congestion from development projects and to identify physical improvements to increase the capacity of roadways, intersections and other infrastructure.

Background Conditions Report

The Background Conditions Report reports on compliance with the 2000 General Use Permit’s conditions of approval, including achievement of the No Net New Commute Trips goal starting on page 47.

View the Background Conditions Report

Stanford plans to continue to implement its Transportation Demand Management (TDM) programs and to expand those programs throughout the life of the proposed 2018 General Use Permit.

Overview of findings

The Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) Analysis concludes that the 2018 General Use Permit will not result in a significant adverse transportation impact. Rather, growth under the 2018 General Use Permit will reduce the average number of Vehicle Miles Traveled per worker and resident in the Bay Area.

The Transportation Impact Analysis (TIA) looks at traffic through the lens of roadway capacity, and conservatively assumes that Stanford does not enhance its existing transportation demand management program to meet its No Net New Commute Trips goal. Under that conservative assumption, the report concludes that increased vehicle trips from campus growth would contribute to significant cumulative impacts. However, Stanford plans to continue to implement its Transportation Demand Management (TDM) programs and to expand those programs throughout the life of the proposed 2018 General Use Permit.  These programs are designed to prevent increased vehicle trips and associated traffic impacts.

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